Alums in the News: Foisor wins U.S. Chess Championship

foisor2UMBC double alumna Sabina Foisor ’12, modern languages and linguistics, and M.A. ’14, intercultural communication, has officially been ranked the top women’s chess player in the nation after taking first place at the U.S. Chess Championship in St. Louis in April.

Foisor was seeded sixth out of 12 finalists from across the country. She won her final match 8-3 against Michigan’s Apurva Virkud in round 11 of the championship. The reigning women’s champion, UMBC chess team alumna Nazi Paikidze, placed second in this year’s tournament.

Foisor, who was born in Romania and arrived in the U.S. in 2008 to play for UMBC, is a Woman Grandmaster in chess and a former European junior champion, as well as a four-time member of the U.S. Women’s Olympiad.

At UMBC, she was part of the team that won the national collegiate championship in 2009, as well as president of the Russian Club. She now lives in Texas, and analyzes chess games and techniques on her YouTube channel.

Alums in the News: GOOOOAL! Edition

Let’s see who made the news this week…we may have a bit of a theme going with this entry.

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Geaton Caltabiano ’14, psychology, will play another season with the Baltimore Blast after seeing action in 14 games in his first year. While at UMBC, Caltabiano was named an America East Player of the Week, and also received a Coaches’ Award for his high academic achievement off the field.

Maceo Rojas ’99, modern languages and linguistics, has coached the St. Vincent Pallotti High School girls’ soccer team to the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland (IAAM) Championships. While the Pallotti Panthers fell to the top-seeded Park School in Saturday’s championship game, they had a 12-3 regular season record, and made it to the second seed in their conference.

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Alumni Awards 2016: Dr. Ian Ralby ’02, Modern Languages and Linguistics, and M.A. ’02, Intercultural Communication

In the weeks leading up to the 2016 Alumni Awards Ceremony, we’ll be profiling each honoree in detail here on the blog. This year’s distinguished alum in the Humanities category is Dr. Ian Ralby ’02, modern languages and linguistics, and M.A. ’02, intercultural communication, founder and CEO of the international consulting firm I.R. Consilium.

i-ralby_headshotEven after completing a law degree at William and Mary and his M.Phil. and Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge, Dr. Ian Ralby still regards the education he received at UMBC as “unequivocally first rate and world class.” The 2002 valedictorian, former Humanities Scholar, and men’s diving team alum fondly remembers the courses that shaped his interest in international studies and the professors who helped him along the way, naming Brigitte May, Bob Sloane, Tom Field, Stan McCray, Jack Sinnigen, Ed Larkey, Gala Stern, John Stolle-McAllister, Angela Moorjani, and the late Carol Barner-Barry as influences. He also considers himself extremely fortunate to have been mentored by UMBC President Dr. Freeman Hrabowski. In the years since graduation, Dr. Ralby has worked on the Saddam Hussein trial, served at the center of international efforts to develop accountability for armed contractors and private security companies, and has been influential in developing the maritime security architecture to counter piracy, trafficking, illegal fishing, and other crime in Africa. After finishing his doctorate, he spent two years working in Bosnia and Herzegovina as an international law advisor, while also building his own firm, I.R. Consilium in London. After the Ebola outbreak temporarily shut down his work in 2014, he returned to Maryland and took a position with the US Government’s Africa Center for Strategic studies as an expert on maritime law and security. In addition to continuing that work for the Department of Defense, he is also currently leading the largest study ever conducted on refined oil theft in his role as a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council. Over the last year, he has also relaunched his consultancy, I.R. Consilium as a US company, and is engaged by several major clients on matters of international law, security, geopolitics, and strategy. His prolific publishing and frequent lecturing is a testament to his commitment “to learn, grow, and build on what I have done so far in order to have greater and greater positive effect on people’s safety, security, and quality of life around the world.”

Join us for the Alumni Awards Ceremony on Thursday, October 6, in the Earl and Darielle Linehan Concert Hall.

Alums in the News: Griner, VanDyke, Doyle, Cangialosi, Clements, and Arthurs

Here at UMBC, we take pride in what our alums accomplish after graduation. Take a moment to see which Retrievers have been on the move and making news!

Anita GrinerFormer UMBC professor and alumna Anita Griner ’99, psychology, was recently appointed Chief Performance Officer of Cognosante. In addition to her work as a graduate professor at UMBC, where she taught advanced program management sciences, Griner has experience with large IT and healthcare programs. Cognosante focuses on aiding healthcare services, specifically dealing with Health Reform initiatives using technology and BPO services. Read full article.


 

photo via washingtonpost.comMaureen Evans Arthurs ’13, gender and women’s studies, recently took to the Washington Post blog with an essay exploring the way in which black women are often profiled as sex workers. The piece, written in response to a recent tweet by Ebony editor Jamilah Lemieux, was titled “I’m a black woman with a white husband. People assume I’m a prostitute all the time.” In it, Maureen shared her own experiences and  sparked conversation around the internet about the reality of racial profiling even in communities that pride themselves on diversity and inclusion. Read the full article.


 

photo via pointandshootfilm.comYou may recall Matthew VanDyke ’02, political science, who was in the news in 2011 due to his fighting and imprisonment during the conflict in Libya. A film based on his experiences recently won Best Documentary at the Tribeca Film Festival. The documentary, titled “Point and Shoot,” is now in theaters in various parts of the nation and numerous festivals across the world. On November 25, the film will come to Baltimore. Check here for location, dates, and more information.


 

photo via citybizlist.comPatrick Doyle ’10 M.A., applied sociology, ’12 Ph.D., gerontology, recently presented a seminar on dementia at Brightview Arlington, an assisted living facility in Virginia. His talk, titled, “Remembering the Past and Respecting the Present: A Recipe for Successful Interactions with People Living with Dementia,” covered the effects dementia has on the perception of reality. Dr. Doyle shared communication tips to improve connection between family and friends living with dementia. Read more.


Recently, UMBC alumni Greg Cangialosi ’96, English, and James Clements ’85 computer science; ’91 M.S. and ’93 Ph.D., operations analysis, were chosen to serve on the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship. In total, 27 people were appointed to work with the NACIE, all focusing on issues relating to the improvement of the competitive workforce. Full list of members.

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Alums in the News: Ralby, Ordóñez, and Cradock

Here at UMBC, we take pride in what our alums accomplish after graduation. Take a moment to see which Retrievers have been on the move and making news!

Ebola-virus
photo via eurasiareview.com

Ian Ralby ’02, modern languages and linguistics, M.A., intercultural communications, writes about Ebola’s effect on organized crime in West Africa. The impact of Ebola has dramatically slowed down, and even stopped, criminal activity throughout the region. Although there is an ironically positive affect of Ebola, there are various negatives as well. For example, illegal fishing because of the “infected” waters. Read more on Ebola’s effect on organized crime.

 

patti
photo via ccom.uprrp.edu

Computer science was not always considered a man’s profession. In fact, many of the pioneering computer scientists were women. But during the 1980s, that changed. In this piece by NPR,  Patricia Ordóñez ’10 M.S. and ’12 Ph.D., computer science, discusses her experience as a woman studying computer science. She explains that when desktops were introduced for use in the home, it caused a shift because these “toys” were more often purchased for boys than girls. Read the full story.

 

 

chad cradock
photo via umbcretrievers.com

UMBC’s Chad Cradock ’97, psychology, recently celebrated his 200th Career Win at CCSA North Invite, a home swimming meet. This has also made Cradock the leading coach in history for wins in the program, surpassing Sid Burkot. “It is a pleasure for a milestone like this to occur at home,” said Cradock. “I am proud to work with talented athletes both in the past and the present for their spirit of hard work and upholding UMBC tradition.” Read the full article.

 

 

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Alums in the News: Booker-Wilkens, Suess, Adams, and Nevins

Here at UMBC, we take pride in what our alums accomplish after graduation. Take a moment to see which Retrievers have been on the move and making news!

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photo via delaware.newszap.co

Melody Booker-Wilkens ’86, political science, was recently named Economic Development director for Sussex County, Delaware. In this role, she will work with private partners to help current employers and seek to bring new job creators to Southern Delaware. Chosen from more than 20 applicants, Wilkens has more than 25 years of experience working in the private and public sector. Read more about her new role.

 

 

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photo via educationdive.com

UMBC’s Chief Information officer, Jack Suess ’81, mathematics, ’95 M.S., operations analysis, recently participated in panel at the Educause 2014 conference. He and other CIOs weighed the pros and cons of social media in a professional work environment and, particularly, its role within an information technology department. See what Suess and the other panelists had to say.

 

 

jerome adams
photo via news.medicine.iu.edu

Jerome Adams (M4) ’97, biochemistry and molecular biology, was recently appointed as Commissioner for the Indiana State Department of Health. Adams has been working in the medical field for several years now with experience teaching and is involved in various professional organizations as well as having done research under Nobel Prize winner Dr. Tom Cech. “His public service and academic achievements make Dr. Jerome Adams the ideal candidate to serve in this role,” said Indiana Governor Mike Pence of the appointment. Read more.

 

Nevins
photo via orangesouthwest.org

Every two years the Vermont Historical Society awards the Cate Fellowship to support research for Vermont history. This year the award was given to Susan Nevins ’86, modern languages and linguistics, and ’91 M.A., instructional development systems. This award will help support her research on the Lyndes family, a black Revolutionary War veteran who made a life in Central Vermont. Full article.

 

 

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